Ramage

Archive for February 2004

Magnificent

Sheet music cover, 'A Trip to the Moon' by Clifford V. Baker, 1907

Sheet music cover, ‘A Trip to the Moon’ by Clifford V. Baker, 1907.

poster urging women to work in aeroplane factories during WW1

Poster urging women to work in aeroplane factories during WW1.

Just two images from the hundreds on view in Rosebud’s WW1 and Early Aviation Image Archive.

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Dave Lovely

February 29, 2004 at 6:10 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Desperate

Fivizzano, November 6, 1808:

“I am desperate because I find myself almost without black paper.”

The letters of a blind Countess.

“Pellegrino Turri had very personal reasons for developing carbon paper. He fell in love with a young woman, the Countess Carolina Fantoni, who had become blind “in the flower of her youth and beauty” (Adler, 1973), and Turri resolved to build her a machine that would enable her to correspond with her friends (including him) in private. Although the machine he constructed no longer exists, several of the Countess’ letters do, and from her correspondence it is clear that Turri’s machine combined carbon paper and the typewriter in a way that did not become prevalent for another 65 years.”

The passionate early history of carbon paper.

As for typewriters, they’re much more than “four rows of keys and a shift”:

the Scholes and Glidden Type Writer, 1873

In the typewriter we find the irruption of the mechanism in the realm of the word. … The typewriter veils the essence of writing and of the script. It withdraws from man the essential rank of the hand …

Heidegger, Parmenides lectures of 1942-43.

See Richard Polt’s Typology: A Phenomenolgy of Early Typewriters , part of his extensive, and excellent, Classic Typewriter site.

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Dave Lovely

February 25, 2004 at 9:45 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Shaking a leg

It remains to be reported that bellona times has ‘collapsed’, undergone a period of ‘restitution’, and ‘built itself up’ again as pseudopodium. I may not understand it, but I know what I like.

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Dave Lovely

February 21, 2004 at 10:10 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

I like

I like i like, because she likes things like old shops, and old cafés, and old bakeries – which are part of what British life is all about – and also things like Dazzle Ships (undeniable proof that Modern Art saves lives):

H.M.S. Argus

and the work of Abram Games, one of the most innovative modern graphic designers, who designed posters like this:

Join The ATS poster

She also maintains the website for the Twentieth Century Society, the major object of which is “to save from needless destruction or disfigurement, buildings or groups of buildings, interiors and artifacts designed or constructed after 1914”.

Thanks to thingsmagazine.

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Dave Lovely

February 21, 2004 at 12:10 am

Posted in Uncategorized

Joueuse au Tarbouka

Joueuse au tarbouka

© coll. R. Vergnieux.

From a collection of some 1,300 late 19th century postcards of Egypt at the Centre de Compétence Thématique d’Ausonius at the Université Michel de Montaigne in Bordeaux.

(select “Egypte” from the navigation bar, and then “CPA” from the dropdown menu).

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Dave Lovely

February 19, 2004 at 6:30 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Here be dragons…

dragons

‘Les Oeuvres d’Ambroise Pare’, Lyon: C. Prost, 1641.

The existence of dragons is documented in this text by the well known surgeon Ambroise Pare (1510 – 1590). The caption on page forty-eight reads:

“Here are represented two types of dragons that kill elephants. The dragons are quite glorious, because by their finesse and malice they defeat elephants which are the strongest animals on earth . . . They lay in wait for the elephants, and suddenly attack them, wrapping themselves around the elephants, tying the elephants’ legs with their tails so they can not walk. Then the dragons stuff their heads in the elephants’ trunks, impeding their breathing. They bite the skin of the elephants which they find most tender, scratch their eyes and suck their blood, so that the elephants die.

Pliny says that there are dragons in Ethiopia that are 10 coudees long [the distance from the elbow to finger tip]. In India some have been found that are 100 coudees long, and some fly so high in the air that they capture flying birds.”

From Seventeenth Century Works at the Mayo Medical Libraries.

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Dave Lovely

February 18, 2004 at 10:04 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Graphic Design in America, 1934-1942

From the pages of PM and AD Magazines, on view at The Doctor Leslie Project .

Photograms by G. Kepes, PM Magazine, February-March 1940.

photograms by György Kepes, PM Magazine, February-March 1940.

'Taurus', illustration by Thomas Benrimo,  PM Magazine, January 1936.

illustration by Thomas Benrimo, PM Magazine, January 1936.

Designs for Columbia Records by Alex Steinweiss, AD magazine, June-July 1941.

designs for Columbia Records by Alex Steinweiss, AD magazine, June-July 1941.

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Dave Lovely

February 15, 2004 at 11:30 pm

Posted in Uncategorized