Ramage

Archive for March 2004

A Demon!

Albeit a very elegant one…

a demon

From Costumes pour opéras et ballets, one of the thousand treasures in the Gallica Anthologie from the Bibliothèque Nationale de France.

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Written by Dave Lovely

March 31, 2004 at 11:14 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Thorazine

detail from Smith Kline French pharmaceutical company ad for Thorazine, 1962

detail from Smith Kline & French pharmaceutical company ad for Thorazine, 1962.

and here’s the copy:

copy from Smith Kline French ad for Thorazine

Adverts for psychiatric drugs from the american gallery of psychiatric art.

There’s also a great French ad from the ’90s which appears to treat “la tendance dépressive” as though it were something that might be reviewed in Cahiers du Cinema.

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Written by Dave Lovely

March 29, 2004 at 4:21 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Asylums

“Let the patient whom you bring, distinctly know where he (or she) is going. A patient seldom forgets being deceived in that particular; and it affects many injuriously, when they hold it as a grievance afterwards.”

The Alabama Insane Hospitals Instructions On Bringing A Patient To The Hospital.

Insane Asylum, Phoenix, Arizona

Insane Asylum, Phoenix, Arizona.

“To some, the asylums of the 19th century represent a darker period in mental health care, with involuntary incarceration, barbaric and ineffective treatments, and abuse of patients.”

Taunton State Hospital, Massachusetts

Taunton State Hospital, Massachusetts.

“However, there is also a legacy of progressive institutional treatment left by Dorothea Dix, Thomas Story Kirkbride, John Galt, and others represented by these buildings and sites: treatments and philosophies which seem rather outdated today, but at the time were a great improvement in the treatment of the mentally ill.”

America’s vanishing Historic Asylums.

The cornerstone ceremonies for the Fairfield State Hospital, Connecticut.

“We thank Thee for Him who on the shores of Gadara ministered unto the man from the tombs and through his own quietness and calmness brought quietness and calmness to that troubled spirit. As we come for this act of dedication we pray Thee, our Father, that those who come here may find freedom from the burden of fear, release from the weight of hallucination, receive light in place of darkness and even to those who must continue to the end of their days with the darkened mind, may there come some measure of light…”

from the Invocation by the Rev. John Maurice Deyo of Danbury.

“What has been said here by your chairman about the increase in insanity or mental ills here in the United States and elsewhere during the present generation makes one shudder. I think, why is it? Is it the kind of life that we are living? Where is the trouble? You have here, you see, great questions in sociology to be studied. I should like to see a report in full on a subject of this kind.”

From the Address of His Excellency Governor Wilbur L. Cross.

Worcester State Hospital, Massachusetts

Worcester State Hospital, Massachusetts.

The above, from the Reverend’s invocation downwards, from Abandoned Asylum, home of Robert Foster’s jaw-dropping photographs and postcards of these amazing buildings.

Traverse City State Hospital, MIchigan – home, incidentally, and burial place, of the “world’s champion cow” – has its own memorial song.

The murals at Kings Park Pychiatric Center, at Newsday.

“Al Cibelli, a former Kings Park employee who has championed the murals, said the faces depicted in the murals are “tortured.” It suggests to him that the murals were done before Thorazine, the first anti-psychotic drug, was widely introduced in 1955.”

This from February 2003 – were the murals saved, I wonder?

Lastly, moving and beautiful artwork by Anna Schuleit , inspired by these abandoned institutions.

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Written by Dave Lovely

March 28, 2004 at 9:21 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Gross Specimens

And we do mean gross (definitely not for the squeamish).

Deformed foetuses from the Gross Specimens Collection, of the American University of Beirut Medical Center, Department of Pathology.

Via ultimate insult.

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Written by Dave Lovely

March 28, 2004 at 11:40 am

Posted in Uncategorized

Abandoned Places

The photography of Geoffrey van Beylen, at Exposed Photography, particularly the sculpture factory.

Via penny dreadful.

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Written by Dave Lovely

March 27, 2004 at 9:30 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Under my skin

An unknown atlas of human anatomy, beautifully reproduced and indexed in detail at the Univerity of Iowa.

the left eye of the dissected face, with its muscles and nerves.

the left eye of the dissected face, with its muscles and nerves.

“This atlas was found without any indication of author, publisher or date. It appears to be quite old as the illustrations are lithographs – around 150 years. The paper is brown and disintegrating. If any of our audience knows to whom we are indebted for this elegant anatomy, please inform us so that we can provide proper credit lines. The text is in German and the lithographs were produced in Leipzig.”

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Written by Dave Lovely

March 26, 2004 at 10:46 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Cable news

After the first messages were transmitted over the Atlantic Cable in August 1858 between Valentia, Ireland, and Trinity Bay, Newfoundland, September 1st was declared as the official day of celebration in New York City.

“The street was clear as noonday, and while the brilliant pageant was passing, afforded a spectacle of popular rejoicing such as has been rarely, if ever, witnessed on this continent.”

(from the Detailed Report of the Proceedings had in Commemoration of the Successful Laying of the Atlantic Cable, by Charles T. McClenachan, New York 1863; the lithograph below is by Sarony, and was first published in 1861)

the Firemen's Procession

The Firemen’s Procession

“…Transparencies were displayed upon every hotel and many private dwellings. Epigrammatic and laudatory mottoes glowed upon the fronts of granite and marble stores….”

(from the Illustrated London News, Sept. 25, 1858)

The History of the Atlantic Cable & Submarine Telegraphy, at Atlantic Cable

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Written by Dave Lovely

March 25, 2004 at 10:33 am

Posted in Uncategorized