Ramage

Archive for February 2005

Two British Artists

Sir Thomas Browne - wood engraving by Gwen Raverat

From the Gwen Raverat Archive at the Broughton House Gallery. Born Gwen Darwin, she was Charles Darwin’s grand-daughter. She once confessed to feeling "so lonely and strange… I don’t know about people – they don’t know about me’.

'Beachs Scene', painting by Wyndham Lewis

‘They must have a very high opinion of him to consider him dangerous’, said Spencer Gore, while The Concise Dictionary of National Biography has this to say:

A towering, undisciplined, and quarrelsome
egotist, his greatest enemy was himsel.f’

Wyndham Lewis: Paintings, Drawings & Publications at Olympia, London, 1-6 March, 2005.

Two (very different) British artists, who coincidentally died in the same year, 1957.

Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements

Written by Dave Lovely

February 27, 2005 at 11:25 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Lush Life

More glass lantern slides, this time from the Florida Memory Project. "These color images depict a variety of Florida’s natural features, including scenes of rivers and river banks, forests, nature trails, fishing, sand dunes, and swimming. Most have no further identification".

glass lantern slide of young women on bicycles

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Dave Lovely

February 26, 2005 at 8:50 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

He gives me the motions

A puppet show, as described by William Hone, in his Every-Day Book (1825):

Scene 2. The money taker called out, "This is the representation of a skeleton." The music played solemnly, and the puppet skeleton came slowly through a trap door in the floor of the stage; its under jaw chattered against the upper, it threw its arms up mournfully, till it was fairly above ground, and then commenced a "grave" dance. On a sudden its head dropped off, the limbs separated from the trunk in a moment, and the head moved about the floor, chattering, till it resumed its place together with the limbs, and in an instant danced as before; its efforts appeared gradually to decline, and at last it sank into a sitting posture, and remained still. Then it held down its skull, elevated its arms, let them fall on the ground several times dolorously; fell to pieces again; again the head moved about the stage and chattered; again it resumed its place, the limbs reunited, and the figure danced till the head fell off with a gasp; the limbs flew still further apart; all was quiet; the head made one move only towards the body, fell sideways, and the whole re-descended to a dirge-like tune. Thus ended the second scene.

Hone’s Every-Day Book is, as the editor of this online edition admits, "rather difficult to categorize". I imagine, from the sound of it, that Hone would be blogging, were he alive today — and he’d be very good at it, too. The weekly instalments of the book contain material as diverse as anecdotes about remarkable or comical cats, execution equipment and Russian bee-keeping.

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Dave Lovely

February 26, 2005 at 12:42 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Bending over backwards

As one does, to bring you links as yet unvisited by other explorers of the blogosphere, Ramage has been toying with the search engine RedLightGreen. Not only does this project – designed specifically for undergraduates using the Web, and the libraries that support them – give access to a database of more than 130 million books, the search results often provide related links to each individual book.

Thus it was that, searching RLG for "magic fire-eaters", one found the splendidly entitled "Fire eating ; Magic bandolin ; The Magnetic girl ; The Human pin cushion ; How to become a contortionist ; Snake charming ; Secret of sword swallowing ; Dancing on broken glass ; The Secret of educating the pig and goose", and its astounding related link the Bibliography of Contortion and Hypermobility, which, in turn, led to this:

page from 1930s book 'The Acrobat'

Page from The Acrobat, by Judy Cholerton, 193?. Apparently, the "Association of American Dancing" is still extant, based in the somewhat unexpected locale of Thornsett, in Derbyshire – not all that far from where I live, in fact.

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Dave Lovely

February 22, 2005 at 8:09 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Behold a wagtail, and you shall see the Gypsies

Written by Dave Lovely

February 20, 2005 at 8:52 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

The doctor will see you now…

Written by Dave Lovely

February 19, 2005 at 8:04 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Anecdotage

To his great embarrassment, Hilaire Belloc was often
forced to produce substandard books in order to pay his bills. During
the 1930s in a railway carriage Belloc noticed a man in front of him
reading a volume of his "History of England". He leaned forward, asked
him how much he had paid for it, and – informed of the price – withdrew
a corresponding sum from his pocket, gave it to the man, snatched the
book from his hand, and tossed it out the window.

Speaking as a bookseller, one can’t help wishing more authors would behave like this…

A random anecdote, from Anecdotage.

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Dave Lovely

February 18, 2005 at 9:09 pm

Posted in Uncategorized