Ramage

Archive for July 2007

Hands off

The orator, like the hysteric, is the anxious object of an abstracting gaze, made to perform his every natural affect and impulse according to a predetermined plot. At times, you can almost imagine that he revolts against this inhuman regimen, that he is madly signaling for assistance, or raises his arm at a random and rebellious angle, letting it drift along a dotted line of his own choosing, through the air’s uncharted ways.

the orator

From A. M. Bacon, Manual of Gesture (1875).

The vexed history of gesture, from Cabinet magazine.

Written by Dave Lovely

July 31, 2007 at 11:00 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Hands off

The orator, like the hysteric, is the anxious object of an abstracting gaze, made to perform his every natural affect and impulse according to a predetermined plot. At times, you can almost imagine that he revolts against this inhuman regimen, that he is madly signaling for assistance, or raises his arm at a random and rebellious angle, letting it drift along a dotted line of his own choosing, through the air’s uncharted ways.

the orator

From A. M. Bacon, Manual of Gesture (1875).

The vexed history of gesture, from Cabinet magazine.

Written by Dave Lovely

July 31, 2007 at 10:02 pm

Posted in gesture, history, language

Pull up a chair…

Bookinist chair

Nils Holger Moormann’s Bookinist chair has a faint air of the Heath-Robinson about it, and even a secret compartment:

for your moleskine, of course

via del.icio.us/HouseholdOpera. Read more about the Bookinist (including some quite strong views in the comments!) at dezeen.

Written by Dave Lovely

July 30, 2007 at 7:50 am

Posted in reading

Despatches

Written by Dave Lovely

July 29, 2007 at 3:08 pm

Posted in despatches, women writers

Tagged with

What a life!

October 1967Includes references to: Prince Pince-Nez, cognizance of diary entries being misinterpreted, Susan Sontag’s new novel, “the child of the high seas,” Cherubino period, Caroline, “Loretta” #2, “Rabbit-Collage,” neighborhood children, collage burst, the new “Ravel-Rabbit” series, John Ashbery, and hallucinative dreaming.

(excerpt from Joseph Cornell Diaries, 1941-1973 at the Smithsonian’s Archives of American Art.)

Reading even the abstracts of Cornell’s diaries can take one many places. They lately brought me, like a monkey on a palanquin, here:

the vision of the Magi

detail, like the monkey, from Sassetta’s The Journey of the Magi, c. 1435. Tempera and gold on wood, 21,6 x 29,9 cm. Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

Today is John Ashbery’s 80th birthday. Happy birthday, JA – keep up the ‘hallucinative dreaming’!

…this is action, this not being sure, this careless
Preparing, sowing the seeds crooked in the furrow,
Making ready to forget, and always coming back
To the mooring of starting out, that day so long ago.

– from Soonest Mended

Written by Dave Lovely

July 28, 2007 at 4:17 pm

Posted in diaries

Tagged with ,

Roo’d

Stinkers! Bugarees! Oolacuntas! No, I haven’t got a potty mouth. Nor am I channeling Captain Haddock.

I’m talking about Chasing Kangaroos by Tim Flannery (a.k.a “the thinking man’s Steve Irwin” – thank you, St. Louis Today!) – the story of “the most remarkable animal that has ever lived”, as reviewed here and here.

Ooh, there goes another one

This here’s an oolacunta, last sighted in 1935. Of course, that may be because no one’s been able to catch up with one since.oolacunta (caloprymus campestris) from Gould’s Mammals of Australia
“the fabulous oolacunta, a rat kangaroo that is now extinct, streaked across the desert at speeds that made it seem to float above the ground…”

Written by Dave Lovely

July 26, 2007 at 4:45 pm

Posted in Australia, books

Tagged with

Despatches

  • Three Percent aims to be “a destination for readers, editors, and translators interested in finding out about modern and contemporary international literature.” The site currently carries reviews of novels by Augusto Monterroso, Enrique Vila-Matas, Jan Kjaerstad and Gabriel Josipovici. An imprint, Open Letter, launches this autumn. One to follow.
  • Susan Sontag? Not stupid enough. Via The Page.
  • “had these works not existed, all would be otherwise.” American poet Barrett Watten on the books, films, and music that had a defining influence on him. Via Ron Silliman.
  • Monsieur Ka has a wonderful post (in French) about Manhatta, a short silent film made in 1920 by photographer Paul Strand and artist Charles Sheeler, with texts from Whitman’s Leaves of Grass, linking it to Manhattan Transfer written by John Dos Passos five years later. I really should read that book, you know. I have his U.S.A., too.

Written by Dave Lovely

July 26, 2007 at 9:12 am